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Sydney West Martial Arts

BJJ Ranking System


Black Belt

Black Belt


As with many other martial arts, the black belt is the highest common belt within Brazilian jiu-jitsu, denoting an expert level of technical and practical skill. Estimates of the time required to achieve the rank vary, but all holders of this rank have thousands of hours of experience. On average most black belts have been training for 10 years before achieving this rank.Brazilian jiu-jitsu black belts are often addressed within the art as professor, although some schools and organizations reserve this honorific for more senior black belts. The IBJJF requires that a student be at least 19 years old and recommends they have spent a minimum of 1 year ranked as a brown belt to be eligible for a black belt.

  • Elvis Sinosic 4th Degree
  • Luke Martin 1st Degree
Brown Belt

Brown Belt

Aside from the exceptional belts awarded at the highest levels, brown belt is the highest ranking color belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu. Brown belt typically requires at least five years of dedicated training to achieve. It is often thought of as a time for refining techniques. The IBJJF requires that students be at least 18 years old and recommends they have spent a minimum of 18 months as a purple belt to be eligible for a brown belt.

  • Kevin Ryman
  • Danny Patching
  • Aiden Meaney
Purple Belt

Purple Belt


Purple belt is the intermediate adult ranking in Brazilian jiu-jitsu. The purple belt level practitioner has gained a large amount of knowledge, and purple belts are generally considered qualified to instruct lower-ranked students. In other martial arts, students with a similar amount of experience are often ranked as a black (instructor) level belt. The IBJJF requires student to be at least 16 years old and recommends they have spent a minimum of two years ranked as a blue belt to be eligible for a purple belt, with slightly different requirements for those graduating directly from the youth belts.

  • Hayden Davies
  • Richard Pappas
  • Luke Castles
  • Kelly Graham
  • Ricky Bennett
Blue Belt

Blue Belt

The IBJJF requires a practitioner remain a blue belt for a minimum of 2 years. Blue belt is the second adult rank in Brazilian jiu-jitsu. At the blue belt level, students gain a wide breadth of technical knowledge and undertake hundreds of hours of mat-time to learn how to implement these moves efficiently. Blue belt is often the rank at which the student learns a large number of techniques. The IBJJF requires that a practitioner be at least 16 years old to receive a blue belt, thereby officially entering into the adult belt system.

  • Lisa Buttigieg
  • Ryan Cameron
  • Jake Haines
  • Tim Novak
  • Darren Bucca
  • Lyn Beard
  • Abby Neilly
  • Poya Katebi
  • Kristian Timothy
  • Meg Baldoch
  • Brad Catto
  • Gaia Tsimnadis
  • Patricia Walewska
  • Luke Franich
  • Adam Comminito
  • Gavin Snape
  • GB
  • Chris Ferro
  • Jason Dirkze
  • Scott Dawson
  • John Rizzo
  • Zac Castles
White Belt

White Belt


White belt is the first belt within Brazilian jiu-jitsu. The rank is held by any practitioner new to the art and has no prerequisite.Some instructors and other high-level practitioners think that a white belt’s training should emphasize escapes and defensive positioning since a white belt will often fight from inferior positions, especially when training with more experienced practitioners. Most academies will additionally require that a white belt level practitioner works to obtain a well-rounded skills set, with a knowledge of basic offensive moves, such as common submissions and guard passes.